Tagged: Linux

It’s not about Open Source

Three days ago we celebrated 25 years from the birth of Linux. I have been an Open Source user for over a decate now and I consider myself lucky to be part of this awesome network.

Open Source gave me free access to applications that, have they been proprietary, I would need to pay good money or illegally obtain them. Open Source fueled my research when I was an undergrad computer science student and, later on, during my MSc and currently during my PhD endeavor. As a researcher it gave me the opportunity to be part of EU funded research projects and get paid to study what I love. As a freelancer it gave me the means to rapidly develop software and therefore deliver competitive, high quality and tested software to my clients. It also allowed me to do consulting work for a couple of amazing software development companies and startups.

Anyways, it was not until recently that I realized that it’s not about Open Source! I was invited as a guest speaker to an event of the Arcitecture Dept., Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. My mission was to present a short history of the free software movement / open source initiative and then present applications of open source to the arts / creative professions. I have never touched a similar area before so I tried to think as a creative professional (NOT easy, if you are a tech person!) and imagine how open source, open licenses and so forth could benefit my world.

After my experiment was over the following came in mind: Open Source helped the world get familiar with the concept of sharing the raw materials of a creation, plus know-how (if needed), allowing the community to take it to the next level. Initially, those creations were open source software and their raw materials the source code but, nowadays, we have moved past that. Books, music, video productions, hardware even games are being published under open licenses.

Supporting openness is a choice anyone can make. Following the philosophy of openness however is a whole different discussion. One that I will leave for another post 🙂

Happy birthday Linux! Happy birthday Open Source!

 

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How to make ClickShare work with Ubuntu

Last time I had to do a presentation was during ODI’s Train the Trainer program. One of the options we were given in order to connect to the projector was ClickShare. If you don’t know what ClickShare is, watch this!

In order to use ClickShare you have to plug it to your machine. It works like a USB flash drive so a folder opens and gives you executables for Windows and iOS. Normally you install one of them and you are good to go.

But what happens if you use a Linux machine? Well, you will probably have to use a cable because “this thing does not work well with Linux”. That’s what I was told! But it wasn’t good enough for me 🙂

So, if you happen to use Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and want to use ClickShare, all you have to do is:

  1. go here *
  2. download the Linux launcher
  3. install it to your machine
  4. open the application
  5. plug the dongle

If you are getting steady white light then you are good to go (hit it, it will normally go red and your screen should be up!).

NOTE: According to Barco, they currently support  Fedora 20 and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. If you are using a different Linux OS this solution will probably not work but you might find some answers to this official thread **!

* 10/03/2017: Support for the Linux client has ended as it requires an enormous effort to support all the Linux distributions and their quick updates, while the usage rate of the Linux client was/is very limited. [as published on barco.com]

** 13/06/2017: Thread [www.barco.com/en/mybarco/mysupport/productsupport/knowledgebase?kbid=1191&productid=b21eda55-0837-4478-87f6-68d51b71e405] does not exist any more.

Cheers!

(image credit: 2piradians @ flickr)

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